Keeping Children Safe In Education – 2019 Updates. 2019 updates to KCSIE

Categories    #Early Years #Further Education #Online Safety #Primary #Safeguarding #Safety #Secondary #Training & Education

By David Paice

David is an education specialist, who has embraced digital transformation as a way of amplifying great teaching and learning practice and securing brighter futures for children and young people. He is a proud teacher by profession, and has been a Director of Education in Local Authorities as well as being a CEO of a multinational software company. David loves working on new, innovative and often disruptive projects that challenge the status quo and create a perpetual learner connection that unleashes awesome experiences for children and young people. He helps organisations see what learners and teachers need and deliver it, all at lower cost, with faster development times, and with greater impact on learner outcomes than anything that came before. You're in good hands!

2 mins

What will I learn?

Upskirting

Serious violence

Keeping Children Safe in Education is statutory guidance that schools and colleges in England must have regard to it when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children.

The 2019 changes are mostly very minor and not requiring any change to school practice.

The new law against “upskirting” is referenced here:

All staff should be aware that “upskirting” is a form of sexual harassment and it is now a criminal offence.

It is defined as “typically involving taking a picture under a person’s clothing without them knowing, with the intention of viewing their genitals or buttocks to obtain sexual gratification, or cause the victim humiliation, distress or alarm.”

The guidance also includes the following new paragraphs on serious violence

All staff should be aware of indicators, which may signal that children are at risk from, or are involved with serious violent crime. These may include increased absence from school, a change in friendships or relationships with older individuals or groups, a significant decline in performance, signs of self-harm or a significant change in wellbeing, or signs of assault or unexplained injuries. Unexplained gifts or new possessions could also indicate that children have been approached by, or are involved with, individuals associated with criminal networks or gangs.

All staff should be aware of the associated risks and understand the measures in place to manage these. Advice for schools and colleges is provided in the Home Office’s Preventing Youth Violence and Gang Involvement and its Criminal Exploitation of Children and Vulnerable Adults: County Lines Guidance.

This Learning Trunk covers...

  • FREE!
    2019 Updates

You might also be interested in...

WeVideo

Make awesome videos online that you can share in just a few clicks!#video editing #cloud

WeVideo

By The Spongy Elephant Team
FREE

View details

Weekly Wow Moments

We share our favourite bite-size wow moments from the web. #wow #inspired

Weekly Wow Moments

By The Spongy Elephant Team
FREE
1 Learning Burst

The world is a wonderful place and sometimes all...

View details

Ofsted and the Role of Governors

Matthew Purves, Deputy Director of Schools talks about who is responsible for governance.

Ofsted and the Role of Governors

By Sonny Sharma
FREE
7 Learning Bursts

View details

Enliven Your Lessons

GOAL #2 Tech has a way of making lessons sparky and fun! These FREE workouts will change how you teach with tech, forever!

Enliven Your Lessons

By Sonny Sharma
FREE
5 Learning Bursts

View details